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Shoulder Fractures

Third most common # in the elderly and 2nd most common in the upper limb. It is twice as common in females due to osteopenia problems:

  • Elderly population, poor bone stock
  • High comminution, displacement & complexity
  • Proximity to shoulder-impairing function
  • Avascular necrosis due to damage to all blood supply to the bone, where the bone dies
  • Pull of rotator cuff muscles-displacing tuberosities
  • Stiffness – need for intensive rehabilitation
  • Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocations

These are injuries of the joint between the collar bone and the acromion (a projection of the scapula bone above the shoulder). It can produce a bulge on the top of the shoulder due to prominent bone. Usually treated non-operatively it may need fixation depending on the patient and injury characteristics. Treatment involves reducing the joint back to its position and using a fixation device to hold it in place.

Medical Secretary

Louise Mcguire
Spire Elland Hospital
Elland Lane
ELLAND
HX5 9EB
01422 324085
louise.mcguire@spirehealthcare.com

Appointments

Spire Elland Hospital
Elland Lane
Elland
HX5 9EB
01422 324041
info@spireelland.com

Spire Elland Hospital
Self Pay Enquiries
01422 324069
info@spireelland.com